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Baked Mineral Blush -- Save with 15% lower pricing!

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To view individual shades, click on color name on drop down list. Color descriptions below.

  • Silky smooth, soft, and easily blends into skin for a natural flush of color.
  • Highly pigmented conditioning formula provides coloration with a small amount of product.
  • Highlights and contours with a delicate radiance.
  • Ultimate build-able color for as much intensity as desired.
  • Natural luminosity achieved with a sheer application.
  • Paraben-free. Fragrance free. No nanoparticles.

BRUSH RECOMMENDATION: Soft blush brush, flat topped bronzer / blush brush.

COLOR DESCRIPTIONS

  • Amaranth. A sophisticated rose gold. Suits all skin tones. 
  • Begonia. Happy pink with a coral undertone.
  • Bouquet. Neutral rose. 
  • Kiss of Pink. Very light delicate blush. Layer for more intense color.
  • Mimosa. Medium pink. Easily builds up from lovely true pink to more intense pink.
  • Peach Dust.Neutral soft peach.
  • Zinnia. A bright happy pink.

 

Totally flattering. Soft, silky, and delicately ethereal radiance.
  • Baked mineral blush is soft, silky, and airy, creating a more natural ethereal glow to your skin.
  • Baking on clay tiles retains moisture and, while product is "dry," produces a very fine, almost creamy, texture that is universally flattering.
  • Sheerness helps prevent overdoing it.
  • You control color depth. Keep it sheer and delicate, or intensify with additional dusting.
  • Excellent for light eye shadow.
  • The idea is to emulate the natural flush of your skin as if you were out in the cold or after exercising.
General color recommendation by skin tone
  • Fair skin: Neutral, peach, sheer plum, or pink shades.
  • Medium skin: Apricot-peach, mauve, rose.
  • Olive skin: Coral, peach, bronze, rose.
  • Dark skin: Raisin, brick, deep rose, tangerine/coral.
  • All skin tones: Bronzer for natural contours.
  • Tired, dull, stressed skin: Use pink / dusty pink to perk up your appearance.
Choose format. In general
  • Combo, balanced, oily skin: Powder, baked minerals, stain (work quickly w/ stains as they dry fast; more unforgiving but extremely long lasting).
  • Very dry skin: Baked minerals, cream; powders followed by setting mist.
  • All skin: Use combination of formats for increased luminosity.
  • All skin: Experiment using lipstick as a cream blush.

BRUSH RECOMMENDATION: Soft blush brush, flat topped bronzer/blush brush.

  • Dust lightly over cheekbones and apples of your cheeks.
  • Apply in light layers. Increase color intensity with additional dusting.
  • Feather into skin with finishing or foundation powder for most natural appearance.

Basic blush application

Half of all women do not apply blush but it is one of the most useful cosmetics for a healthy looking flush and facial contouring. The trick is to avoid intense coloration that gives clown cheeks. The steps below took longer to write and for you to read than it will to obtain a flattering glow, but stay with me on this. The number one rule is to keep color light and natural looking.

1. Choose the proper color. The idea is to emulate the natural flush of your skin as if you were out in the cold or after exercising. You can be Victorian and pinch your cheeks to see what this looks like. Or you can match your lip color. In general, recommended shades by skin tone: Fair skin: Neutral, peach, sheer plum, or pink shades. Medium skin: Apricot-peach, mauve, rose. Olive skin: Coral, peach, bronze, rose. Dark skin: Raisin, brick, deep rose, tangerine. All skin tones: Bronzer for natural contours. Tired, dull, stressed skin: Use pink / dusty pink to perk up your appearance.

2. Choose format. In general: Combo, balanced, oily skin: Powder, baked minerals, stain (work quickly w/ stains as they dry fast; more unforgiving but extremely long lasting). Very dry skin: Baked minerals, cream; powders followed by setting mist. All skin: Use combination of formats for increased luminosity. All skin: Experiment using lipstick as a cream blush.

3. Apply blush after foundation, before finishing powder. Caveat: Makeup artists often recommend blush after eye color and lipstick and some apply blush BEFORE foundation as they say it gives a more natural look. Directions that follow presume foundation has been applied.

4. Use a full size blush brush or flat top bronzer (not your foundation brush). Use a light amount of color on tips (tap brush head on tissue to evenly distribute color and prevent over-application of color).

5. Start at hairline, moving along cheekbone with light downward strokes, leaving a barely there contour of color. This gives structure to your face. Starting at hairline is insurance in case you have too much color on your brush as it is easier to correct at the far edge rather than the middle of your face.

6. Smile into mirror. Find the apples of your cheeks and using same color, or a little more vibrant one, dust lightly for a healthy flush. Use your foundation or finishing powder kabuki, without additional powder, added to lightly dust in a downward motion to feather color into skin for most natural coloration. If too much powder has been applied, use the kabuki with finishing powder added to lessen intensity. If using a cream format, dab color on with fingertip and blend with clean fingers to pick up excess color. Keep it light, regardless of depth of color used. Even deep tone blush should be applied with a light hand. When using a powder brush, no swirling. Keep strokes in same direction. For nude or most natural color, use bronzer with a light hand.

7. For a little extra evening glamour, add a little glimmer dust at the corner of the cheek and alongside the outside of the eye.

TIPS 

Softly apply finishing powder with downward strokes over blush to feather it further and provide the most natural looking glow.

Blush that contains too much sparkle for your taste can be toned down with a light dusting of finishing or foundation powder.

French milled talc*, Tricaprylin, Caprylic/Capric Triglyceride, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate, HDI/Trimethylol Hexyllactone Crosspolymer, Jojoba Esters, Dimethicone, Calcium Silicate, Silica, Polyethylene Terephthalate, Acrylates Copolymer, Calcium Aluminum Borosilicate, Calcium Sodium Borosilicate, Synthetic Fluorphlogopite, Tin Oxide, Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, Hexylene Glycol. May Contain ( /-): Mica, Iron Oxides (CI 77491, CI 77492, CI 77499), Titanium Dioxide (CI 77891), Ultramarines (CI 777), Manganese Violet (CI 77742), Carmine (CI 7547), Bismuth Oxychloride (CI 77163), Red 6 (CI 1585), Red 7 Lake (CI 1585), Red 28 Lake (CI 4541), Yellow 5 Lake (CI 1914), Yellow 6 Lake (CI 15985), Blue 1 Lake (CI 429). *See Notes from Margaret on talc.

*TALC: Be not afraid.

Let's talk talc. Talc is powdered magnesium silicate, an earth mineral known for its softness. In classrooms past, I gave my earth science students sets of rocks and minerals to observe, touch, and test. A piece of talc was included because it registers 1 on the Mohs hardness scale, making it the softest mineral on earth. Students were always delighted to discover its silken smoothness. Each year several pieces of talc required replacement as students found the talc nugget a soothing worry stone to roll in their hand to relieve tension and stress. Life can be a challenge and I was happy to oblige them. I think of this when I read emotional and fearful reactions to the presence of talc in cosmetics. People fear that talc causes cancer. People fear that talc causes respiratory distress. They fear that talc will cause death, disease, or skin irritation. Well, the antidote to fear is knowledge, and current science comes the rescue. Be not afraid. Concerns arose because before the 1970's, talcum powder was often contaminated with asbestos fibers, now a known carcinogen. Once understood, the dangerous asbestos was quickly banned and laws mandated the purity of talc in all products. Certainly today, forty years later, talc is purified, purified again, and then purified one more time before it is released for home products. The researchers at Cosmetic and Personal Care Product Safety affirm this: "Cosmetic-grade talc does not contain asbestos, which is confirmed by X-ray diffraction, and optical and electron microscopy. In addition, the producers of cosmetic-grade talc have established purity specifications to ensure that it does not contain residue levels of asbestos." The primary concern about talc was its linkage to ovarian cancer. This resulted from a small sample study in the early 1990's. Subsequent larger studies up to this date, including recent research, have provided no supportive evidence that talc is carcinogenic or a causative factor in the development of ovarian cancer in humans. (Always look at the date of an online article when reading information about talc.) Lack of supportive data prompted the National Toxicology Program to exclude talc from its list of carcinogens, and withdrew talc from further review as a causative agent for the range of reported adverse health outcomes. Age, family history, excess weight, and hormone therapy remain the major risk factors in the development of this tragic disease. The suspected link with ovarian cancer was associated with perineal use, so err on the side of caution and avoid talcum powder in that area. The relationship of talc to respiratory problems has also lacked confirmation. When animal studies are reported regarding the safety of a substance whether ingested or inhaled, the unspoken variable is that the amount and duration of testing of a substance is dramatically skewed from reality. Almost any particulate matter inhaled in geometrically enhanced proportions over improbable time frames will cause respiratory problems. Such is the case with studies of inhaled talc. Talc is a valuable cosmetic ingredient that is absorbent, is inert which avoids allergenic reactions, is soft, smooth, and enhances slip which makes it a natural alternative to silicones, allowing products to glide on he skin. The Federal Drug Administration classifies it GRAS (Generally Regarded As Safe) and it is used often as an anti-caking ingredient in food products. Yes, sometimes you are probably eating talc. Misinformation of any kind is dangerous and causes us to make poor decisions. Knowledge, not fear, is the most successful guide to life. Be not afraid. Be informed instead. Cosmetic and Personal Care Product Safety Cancer Research UK European Respiratory Journal The American Cancer Society


 

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